Colombelle 2010 L’Original Blanc ($4)

70% Colombard, 30% Ugni Blanc. Gascogne, France; 13.5% ABV
Purchased 5/8/2013 at the Oakland, CA store

Colombelle 2010 L’OriginalI’ve been trying to do my reviews in the order I got them but wanted to get this out today for the sale because it’s a good candidate for a case buy. Grabbed it based on the decent showing of the Colombelle 2010 red and the fact that I love to try grapes off the beaten track. Colombard and Ugni Blanc (aka Trebbiano) are the workhorse grapes of Cognac and Armagnac brandies but not known for stunning table wines with aging potential. Both are known for their acidity.

Very pretty nose – strong ripe cantaloupe, flesh and skin, like a summer muskmelon right off the vine. Hints of herbs and hay, slight honey and tropical notes. Ripe palate, some residual sugar here but zingy acidity makes it almost gulpable. Lush feel, deep flavor – melon and herbs again. Not profound or super complex, but the  right balance and the unquantifiable deliciousness. Crowd pleaser before dinner. Tiny bit of bitterness at the end, but it’s not really unpleasant. The next day, the rest of the bottle had lost a little of the fruit and now seemed slightly too acidic, so I’d drink it soon and in one sitting. I may have to go back for a few more just because I don’t have anything quite like it in my cellar now. When was the last time you had a really nice Colombard? Give it a try for $3.20!

Advertisements

9 thoughts on “Colombelle 2010 L’Original Blanc ($4)

  1. lim13

    I opened a bottle of this tonight and noticed two items right off the bat. I paid $4.99 for this in Kenmore, WA (rather than the $2.99 it showed up for locally in Silverdale four months later) and the alcohol on my bottle says 11.5% alc rather than the 13.5% that dluber noted above in his review. As for the wine…I like it. I detected none of the residual sugar or bitterness that dluber found, but the “zingy acidity” is definitely here. The “herbs and hay” immediately show themselves in the very aromatic nose and flavors too. Unlike the “quaffers” I mentioned in a previous comment here, this one is very refreshing and flavorful, but in my opinion, definitely needs food…perhaps shellfish or simple roasted chicken with herbs. Still doing fine at four years old.

    Reply
    1. flitcraft

      Love your reviews of earlier GO wines. For those of us with unorganized cellars, it’s good to see how something bought earlier is drinking–good or bad. Not to make more work for anyone, but it would be great to have a section of “How’s it Doing?” so that we can easily find oldies but goodies current tasting notes. Having them attached to the original reviews in the home section means that they’ll drop off the side list quickly with newer entries and thus become unnoticed after a brief time. Also, having the notes in a specifically labeled place will save newbies from thinking that the wine is currently available and being disappointed to discover it isn’t. Anyway, keep ’em coming no matter what; they’re a terrific asset to the site! (And I promise to add some oldies notes of my own, since I’m doing more cellar-drinking than buying these days…)

      Reply
      1. lim13

        Appreciate your comments very much, flitcraft. I’ve always appreciated hearing from others how wines are changing over time, so I like to “pay it forward”. And of course I’m a bit of an obsessive/compulsive when it comes to notes and my cellar. BW is the techno “professional” for the blog, so I’ll leave your suggestion of a “How’s It Doing?” tab to him…though I think your reasons for it are well-stated. Again, thanks for sharing your thoughts.

        Reply
      2. BargainWhine

        Hi flitcraft. Unfortunately, while I highly value your participation here, I think this request is not going to work for me. First, I would always want updated notes to be posted as a comment on the original review anyway, so it’s all in one place. Given that, the other page would be a duplicate: extra work and probably not very interesting for most readers. And if you want to see whether anyone has posted updated notes for a wine you have, you can always look up that review using the search feature. Newer comments are at the top. Although I well understand one may not remember the contents of one’s cellar until seeing a new tasting note about it, I feel that extra assistance is probably not worth adding. Any other thoughts, anyone?

        Reply
    2. lim13

      We consumed our last bottle of this tonight…a little more than one year after the previous one. I still really enjoy this wine and age hasn’t diminished it one bit. Tart, bright, herbal and grassy and it went extremely well with TJ’s delicious, fully baked, flaky, chicken pot pie (which I highly recommend) if you’re into that kind of thing.

      Reply
  2. Jen

    This wine was divine at dinner tonight, along with a shrimp mango ceviche. I hope there is more at my store!

    Reply
  3. lim13

    I’ve been drinking Gascogne Ugni Blanc and Ugni Blanc /Columbard blends for about 25 years…especially Domaine Du Pouy at only $7-$8 regular price. They’re definitely not for ageing and I enjoy them most, slightly chilled on warm sunny days. Most have full fruit, are slightly grassy and have great acidity. They epitomize the word “quaffer”. Would love to see this one up north here, but nothing yet. And what I really want to know is which Original is the real original?
    https://grossoutwine.wordpress.com/2013/02/05/2010-rigal-the-original-sauvignon-blanc-france-5-99/ By the way, there was still quite a bit of the Rigal at the Silverdale store last night for you last minute sale shoppers.

    Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s