A Riesling Reckoning, Part 2

A couple of weeks ago I posted Part 1 of this short series of Riesling reviews.  This will be the last German Riesling post for the wines I purchased back on June 3rd.  As I mentioned then, both of these wines are produced by Rudi & Herta Veit of Piesport on the Mosel.  Both are Piesporter Goldtropfchens…the first a Kabinett at 9% alc. and the second a Spatlese at 8% alc..  Both are from the 2008 vintage.  The labels are identical except for Kabinett/Spatlese and alcohol content.  The Kabinett runs around $16 regular retail and the Spatlese about $18.  Both were selling at the Silverdale, WA GO for $5.99.

IMG_1051The Kabinett is brilliant pale green/golden and has a wonderfully aromatic nose of green apple, honey and peach/apricot.  It comes off as relatively sweet on the front of the tongue, but as with all fine German Rieslings, it switches to lemony tartness at mid-palate and finishes sweet/tart as it washes over the back of the tongue.  Flavors of Granny Smith apple and semi-ripe peaches.  Just the slightest tinge of petrol/diesel quality.  A very lovely white wine that’s impeccably balanced between fruity sugar and tart acidity.

The Spatlese is again brilliant and just slightly more golden than it’s sister Kabinett.  Nose is considerably more closed in and I really couldn’t detect the lemony quality that was apparent in the Kabinett.  There’s more of a sweet apricot and late harvest quality to this one.  Slightly sweeter (as it usually should be), there’s also more viscosity here and the sweetness lingers longer from beginning to end.  The peach flavors show more ripeness, but the acidity is again tart and lemony and balances out the sugars perfectly.  Quite delicious.  Both Rieslings get a big thumbs up!  If you’re new to German wines or never quite understood the differences in classification or just need a refresher, read thisIMG_1052

I tasted both of these wines at cool cellar temperature, but would recommend chilling them for about an hour.  Delicate wines like these won’t release all their fruity floral character if overchilled.  They’re both great quaffers with cheeses, fruit and nuts, but would likely do well with spicy Asian fare too.  Here’s a link to a review of the Spatlese that includes an interesting food match as well.  It might work with a slightly sweet pumpkin or butternut squash ravioli with sage/butter sauce too.

Advertisements

14 thoughts on “A Riesling Reckoning, Part 2

  1. flitcraft

    We still had a few of these kicking around, so I popped one with a chicken curry. It’s still a nice sweet-tart wine, but it’s a bit more golden in color than when I last tried it, and it’s got a slight madeirization going on. I’m honestly surprised it’s on its way down hill, since decent Rieslings generally make old bones. But if you have this one, drink up. It won’t get any better, I think. I’ll be trying our last two bottles soon, and will post again if they’re showing less age.

    Reply
    1. lim13 Post author

      Was it the Kabinett or the Spatlese that you had, flitcraft. I just noticed both in my cellar while down there grabbing a bottle of 2008 Lawson’s Dry Hills NZ Gewurz for dinner with chicken freekeh (the grain you introduced me to) last night.

      Reply
      1. flitcraft

        It was the Kabinett. I’m still hoping it might be a mishandled bottle, because at 6 years of age from a reputable vineyard, it really shouldn’t be as tired as that one was.

        Reply
        1. lim13 Post author

          My thoughts exactly. I may just be forced to open a bottle. We’re having Thai curry tomorrow, so I smell an opportunity.

          Reply
          1. lim13 Post author

            Reporting back for flitcraft and our other interested readers. Opened a bottle of the kabinett with Masaman curry shrimp with Jasmine rice tonight and the wine is still pale green/golden, in pristine condition and just as described above in June of 2013. So I’m guessing it’s that one bottle, FC. There’s hope!

            Reply
            1. flitcraft

              I’m glad to hear that. I still have two bottles left, and one is on ‘death row’ this weekend.

            2. flitcraft

              And, the verdict is, definitely bottle variation. We still had about a quarter bottle of the tired/madeirized bottle to try back to back with an unopened bottle. Two very different wines, as it turned out. The second bottle was young and sprightly, about two shades paler in the glass, and no signs of age at all. Ironically, the new bottle had a bit of staining on the top of the front label, which suggested a possibility of leakage and thus possible oxygen exposure. But it wasn’t an issue. So, false alarm, I guess. This is a very nice Riesling that I would gladly pay a lot more for. If GO acquires more of this winery, I’d certainly jump on them.

  2. joelA

    Goldtropfchen is a premium vineyard in Piesport while Michelsberg is a name that can be used for a number of lesser Piesport vineyards (or a blend of grapes from different vineyards). That normally explains the difference in quality, although a good producer can make very good Michelsberg and a poor producer can make poor quality Goldtropchen.

    Reply
  3. dluber

    I got a couple of Veit rieslings a couple years ago at GO, forget the appellation; liked it enough to go back for seconds. I’ll dig one out and pop it and report back.

    Reply
    1. lim13 Post author

      Thanks, dl. Would love to hear about it. I’ve been pretty impressed with the Veits I’ve had.

      Reply
  4. the winegetter

    Nice wines!! WOW. And great finds. I agree that Riesling should best be served chilled, especially the sweeter ones, because if too warm the sweetness can be just too overbearing…Goldtropefchen is definitely one of my favorite vineyards along the Mosel. Worlds apart from the yucky Michelsberg…

    Reply
    1. lim13 Post author

      Thanks for checking in, winegetter. It’s always nice to hear from a German on my reviews of German wines! : ~) And if I might ask…what exactly is it that you don’t care for about the wines from Michelsberg…in comparison to those of Piesport?

      Reply
      1. the winegetter

        I thinkmost Michelsberg lack the depth of a Goldtroefchen. Just low acidity, and sweetness. Like any boring German wine. The Goldtroepfchen shows more depth for sure.

        Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s