Vertikal 2011 Piesporter Goldtröpfchen Riesling Spätlese “Special Collection”

Mosel, Germany; 8.5% ABV
$4 at the Berkeley, CA, store on 9 Jan.  Probably also still at Richmond.

2011_Vertikal_Riesling_SpatleseI had shied away from the Vertikal wines that have shown up at the GO.  But after Lim13 has consistently liked them (most recently the 2010 Riesling Auslese, which I have not seen near me in CA), and I needed something to go with an Asian-sauced dinner, I picked up this bottle.  I’ll add this to the list of Vertikal wines that are good for the price.

I’m not the expert in German wines that Lim13 and others here are, so I didn’t really know what they meant when they described a “diesel” quality in German Rieslings.  However, from the first smell of this wine, my reaction was, “Oh, so that’s what they’re talking about!”  On first exposure, I can’t say I’m especially attracted or repelled by this quality, but it is interesting.  While there’s diesel (Or kerosene?  I’m also not an expert in petroleum distillates.) on the palate, too, there’s also nice white and yellow pear, with nicely balancing acid of said pears and some green apple / lemon.  For something I’m touting as having a diesel flavor, the overall impression from the wine is that it is very clean and clear, smooth and even.  It’s not very complex, but it’s still pretty tasty for what you pay.

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15 thoughts on “Vertikal 2011 Piesporter Goldtröpfchen Riesling Spätlese “Special Collection”

  1. flitcraft

    This is probably a good place to note that the Lake City Seattle GO has the Vertikal Special Collection Piesporter Michelsberg Auslese at the same price. I’d be happier to see the Piesporter Goldtropchen, but given how tasty the plain old Mosel Auslese was, it’s well worth trying. I plan to do so in a few days.

    Reply
    1. flitcraft

      And I thought it very good indeed, especially at the price. More apricot-y than the Mosel Auslese blue bottle version. According to the Lake City GO shelf tag, it’s supposedly a 6.99 wine at full retail. I find that really hard to believe. If it’s true, then it’s a real deal even at full retail. I’d happily pay in the mid to high ‘teens for it.

      Reply
      1. BargainWhine Post author

        Hi flitcraft. Thanks for the update and notes. You’re referring to the Vertikal Special collection Piesporter Michelsberg Auslese, right? Do you know which vintage?

        Reply
  2. lim13

    Great to see you getting a “toe in the water” on the Vertikal Rieslings, BW. And how did it go with your “Asian-sauced dinner”? I’ve been very surprised and pleased at how tasty most of the Vertkal wines have been. I’d feel completely confident trying any new ones that show up at GO, although I haven’t seen this one up here yet (just as you haven’t seen the Auslese down your way). Hard to define I’m sure, but how sweet would you consider this wine to be?

    Reply
    1. BargainWhine Post author

      Hi Lim13. I felt like this wine did actually not go that well with my dinner, which was tofu and white chard, with soy sauce, fish sauce, mirin (sweet cooking sake), cooking rice wine, ginger, and garlic. The flavors in the wine were actually on the lighter and more delicate side, and were a little overwhelmed by the darker flavors in the sauce and the vegetable. The wine would probably have gone better with fish or pork without the heavier sauces. The scale on the back label puts this wine firmly on the Sweet end, but maybe because of the lighter character, I didn’t find this wine to be extremely sweet. I would say it’s not as sweet as I had expected it to be from the Spätlese classification. I guess I would put it slightly sweeter than “off-dry.”

      Reply
      1. JWC

        I picked up a few bottles of this, and was planning on serving it with a caramel drizzled cake tonight, anticipating sweetness. I may have to reconsider, or just go with it and see how they pair together.

        Reply
        1. BargainWhine Post author

          Hi JWC. This weight and sweetness of this wine is much less than that of caramel, but you may well like the pairing. I’m guessing it would taste almost like a dry wine along with the caramel. Please let us know if you try it.

          Reply
          1. JWC

            Hi BW & Lim13, we did try it…and the caramel drizzle cake, did overwhelm the wine with sweetness, not in a terrible way, but while drinking the wine with the cake, the riesling did seem dry in comparison. A late harvest riesling or the Auslese Lim13 suggested would be a better pairing. I was initially thinking the contrast might work, similiar to a sweet/salty analogy-like combination of flavors, but while a decent match, this didn’t hit it out of the park. That being said, our guests enjoyed the wine, and we went through 2 bottles. Far more enjoyable by itself, a flavorful, medium bodied and slightly complex wine. Good value, Thumbs Up.

            Reply
        2. lim13

          If you bought a few bottles, JWC…I’d say go with your initial idea and try it. It’s likely worth the experience…though I suspect the Vertikal Auslese that I reviewed might be the better match. Let us know for sure. By the way…none of the Auslese down your way?

          Reply
          1. JWC

            None of these in Portland, that I’ve seen. I ventured over to Vancouver, where I picked this up. Should have picked up the Auslese, as well, but the blue bottle…well I hesitated, and didn’t see your review until later Lim13. Thanks for the comments and insight as well BW, I will try this combo tonight, and let you know.

            Reply
    2. lim13

      Thanks, BW. Fish sauce and rice wine can be tough to match for me…even very little in a recipe. One of the attributes I enjoy most about German Rieslings is the acidity (if the wines are made correctly) offsets the sugars.

      Reply
      1. JoelA

        Opened a bottle of the 2011 Piesporter Goldtropfchen spatlese the other night. It has the delicacy that BW mentioned. The wine is a bit lighter than usual even for the Mosel but the flavors are right on.

        Reply

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