Arceno 2005 Chianti Classico Riserva

Chianto Classico DOCG, Italy; 13.5% ABV
$7 at the Richmond, CA, store on 28 Apr

Arceno_2005_ChiantiClassicoThis wine had a fair amount of dark crystalline sediment in the bottom, including a good bit crusted around the cork.    However, there seemed to be very little of the fine sediment that I worry about becoming re-suspended in the liquid.  The crystals just collect in the bottom of your glass and don’t affect the taste.

For the first couple hours I opened and decanted the wine, I was not optimistic that it would be very good.  Although the color was nicely dark red and saturated for Chianti, the fruit was quite simple and was spoiled by a strong bitterness of grape seed and stem.  However, after two hours, it seemed like there might be some life in there, and by three hours open, the wine was very tasty, and it kept improving over the next hour or so.  It wound up showing plenty of dark red cherry with some plum, blueberry, cherry pit / wood, and slight dark rose / violet, in a heavier medium body.  I liked the wine better with our red cabbage and ham casserole than on its own.  So… Thumbs Up if you can plan ahead enough to give it three hours of air.

Advertisements

19 thoughts on “Arceno 2005 Chianti Classico Riserva

  1. BargainWhine Post author

    On November 9, 2014, GOWineLover wrote:
    I think it’s getting a little over the hill since I found the fruit a bit lacking but it still had really nice overall mouthfeel. Seems mighty time to drink up to me.

    Reply
  2. BargainWhine Post author

    Berkeley GO got a bunch more of this in, and not much new, so I got another bottle and opened it tonight. I thought it needed only about 1:45 to air acceptably, that the flavors became darker and not as tangy as I remember, and more simple. Still quite good for the price.

    Reply
  3. Expat

    I just re-bought this today. I was initially attracted to the black rooster on the neck, assuring some level of quality. I agree, it needs some air time but i found it to be nice. Not ethereal but much more than drinkable. It had some elegance and sophistication. It wasn’t think like some Chiantis. Great with food and before I knew it the wife and I had killed the bottle. i woke up the next day feeling fine, which I experience with well made European wines.

    Reply
    1. BargainWhine Post author

      Hi Expat. I agree this wine is more on the full-bodied fruity end of Chianti rather than on the delicate, floral, and ethereal end. I’m glad to hear it worked well for you and yours.

      Reply
        1. JoelA

          The winemaker worked at Edmeades before it was acquired by Jess Jackson but the winery was well known for its reds. I liked this wine but it’s bigger-bodied than other Riservas I’ve had. It may be that the wine contains some cabernet.

          Reply
          1. BargainWhine Post author

            Hi Joel! Yes! Thank you! I had totally forgotten to include that information. I couldn’t find anything for this vintage, but other vintages of this wine are only about 80% Sangiovese, with the remaining 20% being a combination of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot.

            Reply
    2. Darrell

      Expat, I just read your Draper & Esquin PN review, thanks btw, and now this and I am wondering if you are sensitive to fusel alcohols. Do distillates, other than vodka, bother you? You are lucky. Your wife helps you kill a bottle, whereas my wife doesn’t do her share and I am left to kill the bottle by myself, if it’s good wine. So far so good on feeling fine the next morning no matter the origin of the wine.

      Reply
      1. Expat

        Hi Darrell. I don’t know if I’m sensitive to fusel alcohols. I like bourbon but it doesn’t take much to make me feel lousy the next day. How would I determine that?

        Reply
        1. Darrell

          Expat, look up fusel oil or alcohol. During distillation of spirits usually the first and last parts of distillation are removed. These are called heads and tails, respectively. Heads are nasty and sharp and if much SO2 is used in the winemaking, this comes out in this fraction. The tails have the fusel oils and it’s the part that gives people hangovers and much depends on where the tails cut is made. Cognacs are double distilled and should have less fusel oil. Armagnac , Bourbon and Scotch might have more. Determination would be to make a fist and have your wife pull up a finger and if you see more than one or none then you got a problem. My test would be to drink a volume of vodka equal to the Bourbon that makes you feel lousy and see how you feel. Vodka should be clean of these fusels. Our only problem for us here is that we can’t predict how much fusel oil might be in a wine, but you seem to have that figured that out.

          Reply
  4. Richard

    I tried a bottle of this Chianti last week and was very impressed by it. Chiantis can vary considerably in style and the Arceno is a bold, restrained wine, whose fruit is hidden behind an earthy, tannic structure. It’s also a riserva, so it has had additional oak aging (although the oak is not dominant). This wine is almost 9 years old and at its peak now. $7 usually gets you a simple, fruity, 2 dimensional Chianti that is not Classico (from the heart of the Chianti region, where the best Chiantis are made). It’s a great deal in my opinion.

    Reply
    1. BargainWhine Post author

      Hi Patrick. Lest someone take you seriously here, I don’t think this wine needs that much air. After a few hours of air, this wine was tasty, but I would guess not solid enough to hold up after being open all day.

      Reply
      1. Patrick

        BW. I tried a glass of the Arceno and didn’t like the bitterness then forgot to re-cork it, so I did in the morning, that evening it was nice but I missed the 3 hour air time. I got the “open at breakfast drink for dinner” thing from old SF Italians who do just that with some Italian wines. You guys do a great service to those of us who need some professional level advice in our vice of choice, good cheap wine! Oh! Thanks!

        Reply
        1. Darrell

          ” I got the “open at breakfast drink for dinner” thing from old SF Italians who do just that with some Italian wines,” North Beach breakfast of vino rosso and pizza and life is good.

          Reply
    1. BargainWhine Post author

      Hi Bill. Do you mean the second half of the bottle, which you put the cork in the top of, and put in the fridge? I agree it needs air but no aging.

      Reply

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s