Duca Petraccone 2010 Primitivo (Zinfandel)

Salento Idicazione Geografica Protetta, Italy; 13% ABV
$5 at the Richmond, CA, store on 8 June

DucaPetraccone_2010_PrimitivoOn the night I opened this, I didn’t think much of it.  The red / purple cherry fruit tasted to me more like Cabernet than Zinfandel and it was rather too light compared to the acid.  Also, there was a sort of off, pruney taste I disliked.  I liked this wine best after about 90 minutes in a decanter, when it was tolerable, but after than it seemed to decline again.  It’s possible the saved single-glass screw-cap bottle has improved, but I doubt it.

To my surprise, the saved glass of this wine was not bad.  While it no longer tasted like Cabernet, it still did not taste at like California Zinfandel: tangy, dark and tart red cherry fruit, orange, prune, maybe nutmeg, still on the tart side but now with acid nicely integrated with the fruit.  A bit more like I think of Valpolicella, geographically far from Salento.  So, I guess it’s okay, but don’t expect it to be anything like a Zinfandel.

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22 thoughts on “Duca Petraccone 2010 Primitivo (Zinfandel)

  1. EHL

    Picked up a bottle in Seattle’s Madrona GO for a five spot…pleasantly surprised that the usual “PNW $urcharge” was not applied…and even more pleasantly surprised after popping and pouring with the quality of wine immediately presented.

    My companion and I both enjoyed it immensely…a well-balanced little Italian import that is definitely different from Cali Zins…lighter in body, dry, fruity yet not jammy, with an inviting bouquet of spice and red cherries…and assume from prior tasting notes that it will only improve the next day.

    ;}

    Reply
      1. Expat

        I agree with Seedboy and EHL – this is a very pleasant wine. I popped and poured with no decant time. I got a nice dusty fruit nose so common in Euro wines. Like EHL said, there is a fruity element but not jammy or thick. It was dry at the same time with a very clean finish. Not complex or lingering but had a very smooth finish. If you like old world wines it’s a good buy. It’s actually kinda fruity for an Italian wine but with much better balance than an American fruity wine. It went great with my pasta – orchiette with Italian sausage, rapini, cannelini beans, salt cured olives and olive oil.

        BW, maybe you got a bad bottle?

        Reply
        1. Darrell

          Never thought to add beans to pasta and I agree with SB about the dish sounding good. Will have to try with boar Italian sausage.

          Reply
          1. Expat

            the beans add a subtle creaminess. Especially good with a pasta that doesn’t have a traditional sauce. the moisture in this comes from the rapini, olive oil, a little pasta water added back in and the beans. This style of dish goes well with both red and white wines.

            Reply
        2. weinish

          No one should be drinking this wine with the Villa Travignoli Chianti still on the shelf.

          Yes, very different wines, I know. But one blows the other way, AND costs less.

          Reply
          1. Expat

            No sign of it on the Central Coast otherwise I’d be all over it. I’m happy for you though. Toast me next time you enjoy some.

            Reply
    1. Fernando

      From Grocery Outlet Crown Hill, Seattle, WA
      The wine is absolutely fine, more Than that , it is great for $5.99.
      We had it with pasta and Bolognese sauce,..Brilliant , I just love the structure, taste and gamey lingering favor. Great for the 4th and your lovely bbq!

      Reply
      1. BargainWhine Post author

        Hi Fernanado and welcome! I’m glad to hear this wine has another fan. I have a hard time imagining this somewhat austere wine going with the sweetness of BBQ, but my bottle may have been unusual. Cheers!

        Reply
  2. Robert Brumer

    not tasted it but, once you get that pruney flavor it usually comes from a wine that has been cooked, hot storage or the like

    Reply
    1. Darrell

      The like being oxidized from some Italian winemaking. Pruney and leathery put me off Italian in the ’70’s. Even today when I taste super Tuscans and Brunello de Montalcino I ask myself,
      ” That much money for this wine? I’d rather put that money into Bordeaux.”

      Reply
      1. weinish

        Yeah, but I love that taste. I can understand not loving it though.

        I’ve actually never had top end french wines..I’m holding off…

        Reply
  3. seedboy

    I liked this wine. It is Italian and seemed more traditional to me for all of the reasons you doubt it. Italian wine is traditionally made for table, so it is more acidic than what most folks do here. Most California zin is made to be a fruit bomb, so it hangs longer and the acids diminish as the sugars increase. I like the balance of this just fine.

    Reply
    1. weinish

      Innnnnnteresting….

      I’ve got a bottle on my table I nabbed today, and it was going back until SeedB stepped up

      Guess I’ll find out tmrw.

      Btw…picked up a 2008 Colline Teatine Sangiovese yesterday as well. Decanted it because sometimes if a wine seems dated it can help, at least for me.

      Not worth buying. Drinkable at best.

      Reply
      1. BargainWhine Post author

        Interesting, Seedboy, and thanks! Did you like it on the first day? I agree there is more to this wine than there is to the Risorgimento Barbera that I think is still at the Berkeley store for $7, although I’d say they were similar in overall character.

        Weinish, do let us know what you think if it.

        Reply
          1. Seedboy

            weinish that barbaresco is very good. I still see it around. 2010 is a great vintage, apparently all over Italy.

            Reply
            1. weinish

              Yeah, it’s around. Costs more in Oakland than it does San Leandro, but a buck.

              Had this wine. Enjoyed it. Earthy for sure. Somewhat my style. Wife was unsure, but she has a GO hangup, sometimes.

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